lundi 30 novembre 2015

Women’s motivation toward RE training

Motivation is a very important factor in maintaining commitment towards training. In there research, Focht et.al. (2015) assessed the effects of resistance exercise (RE) on the affects of further participation. Their subject were recreationally trained women that performed 3 sessions at different load (40% 1RM , 70% 1RM and Self-Selected). Their results showed that the Self-Selected (SS) condition reported the highest intention towards future RE training. This is a direct representation that Autonomy-Supportive (AS) environment can increase motivation (Deci & Ryan 1985). Motivation is affected mainly by 3 aspects : Autonomy, Competence and Relatedness. An AS climate is designed to give some freedom of choice to participants to help increase motivation towards the activity. Self-Selected RE seem to be an effective strategy to increase motivation. 


 A second result from the study was that « affective response » were not related to intention or self-efficacy post-training. In the SS and 40% 1RM session, subjects rated increase in pleasure during the RE. Whereas in the 70% 1RM session they rated « displeasure » , which was only a transient situation and affect improved post-training. The authors suggest that affect improve after acute RE irrespectively of the load. Those results indicate that immediate pleasure is going to be higher if the subject use light load or SS load, however heavier loads have no effect on post-training affect and intention of future training. These findings are similar to those of Ekkekakis et.al. (2008), where they use aerobic exercise Below, At and Above ventilatory threshold. Higher intensity was link to more acute displeasure, where affect post-exercise was irrespective of exercise intensity. These results are very interesting since they show that it is possible to impose higher intensity of work without negatively influencing motivation. The authors suggest that preparing women to manage the potential discomfort will help reduce the acute displeasure associated with imposing higher intensity.  


  • Focht B.C., Garver M.J., Cotter J.A., Devor S.T., Lucas A.R., Fairman C.M.AFFECTIVE RESPONSES TO ACUTE RESISTANCE EXERCISE PERFORMED AT SELF-SELECTED AND IMPOSED LOADS IN TRAINED WOMEN. JSCR 29-11, 3067-3074. 2015.
  • Ekkekakis, P, Hall, EE, and Petruzzello, SJ. The relationship between exercise intensity and affective responses demystified: To crack the 40-year-old nut, replace the 40-year-old nutcracker! Ann Behav Med 35: 136–149, 2008.
  • Deci E.L. & Ryan R.M. Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behavior. New York: Plenum. 1985

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